The village is built in a narrow and steep valley of the Ludja river, flanked on all sides by the magnificent pastoral and sunny landscape of the Rhodope mountains. The 19th century architecture differs from the National Revival architecture elsewhere in the country. The mountain relief does not permit sprawling buildings, so therefore the Shiroka Lucka houses are built on a small area which is compensated by height. Two-three storeys are common, each jutting out over the one below. The roofs are covered with heavy stone tiles. The exterior is highly dynamic. The high stone foundation serves as a pedestal for the markedly forward brought exquisite white facade of the first floor. All walls on the ground floor, as well as the three outer walls on the second floor are made of surface stone with wooden crossbeams. The southern facade and the inner walls of the second and third floor have a wooden scaffolding and plastered wattle fence. Besides breaking up the houses architecturally and providing more space, the eaves also serve to attract more light with more and larger windows on the facade facing the sun. Typical examples of Rhodope architecture include the Kalaidjiiska, Karovska, Ouchikova, Bogdanova, Massourska, Bagrinska and Grigorovska houses. The Shiroka Lucka locals still treasure their old traditions and hospitality, while weaving Bulgaria’s most beautiful woolen rugs. Their school for national instruments and singing is proud to claim the Rhodope song as Bulgaria’s most emotional and moving one.